News Medical

News Medical

West Virginia awards substance abuse services grants

News Medical
Nearly $21 million in state funding has been awarded to expand residential treatment services for substance abuse across West Virginia, the state Department of Health and Human Resources announced Monday. The funding comes from recent court settlements with opioid distributors. Legislation passed earlier this year mandates that DHHR allocate additional treatment beds to be operated by the private sector. They are intended to provide treatment services in existing or newly constructed facilities. The programs selected by the DHHR’s new Office of Drug Control Policy are Living Free Ohio Valley; Wheeling; Mountaineer Behavioral Health PLLC, Martinsburg; St. Joseph Recovery Center LLC, Parkersburg; Westbrook Health Services Inc., Parkersburg; Valley HealthCare System Inc., Morgantown; We

Why Do Opioid Overdose Deaths Keep Climbing As A Drug

News Medical
Dr. Phillip Coffin compares naloxone–the drug used to reverse the effects of opioid overdoses–to seat belts. Seat belts can prevent drivers and passengers from dying in a car crash, but seat belts can’t prevent the crashes themselves. Naloxone can prevent people who overdose on opioid drugs from dying, but it can’t prevent overdoses in the first place. In fact, if you’ve survived an overdose, your chances of overdosing again in the next year are around 25%, says Coffin, director of substance use research at the San Francisco Department of Health. And your chances of dying from a subsequent overdose are substantial, suggests a Massachusetts study presented Monday in Washington, D.C., at the American College of Emergency Physicians’ annual meeting. Opioid overdose deaths nearly d

HIV is highest among African-Americans. This advocate is working to change that.

News Medical
Launched nearly 30 years ago, World AIDS Day is observed annually on Dec. 1. Since its inception in 1988, the goal has been to raise awareness about HIV/AIDS and commemorate the 35 million people who’ve lost their lives to the epidemic. Today, nearly 1.1 million people in the U.S. are living with HIV, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) — one in seven individuals aren’t aware they are infected. It is estimated more than 36 million people were living with HIV/AIDS worldwide in 2016. Jesse Milan, Jr., is president & CEO of AIDS United, a national nonprofit dedicated to ending AIDS in America. A licensed attorney with a law degree from New York University, he is one of many African-Americans fighting the disease via advocacy, research, and education.